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United States Daughters of 1812 chaplain Evelyn Jackson, left, president Carol Seals, right, and historian Edith Key present the new gravestones. Photos by Leslie Radcliff

War of 1812 more than history for Land Family


September 12, 2012
Descendants of Pvt. James B. Land and his wife, the former Dicy White, attended a grave dedication ceremony for the couple Sunday at the Yates-Union Chapel Cemetery in Grantsburg.

The dedication is the fruition of a dream and a process began by Betty Jo Land when she located the site of their burial. Since then, the Lands have worked to have the markers recognized.

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Reg Land speaks to the crowd about his family’s legacy while his grandson, Tyler, listens.
"It's a great honor to my mom and her work," Reg Land, Betty Jo's son, said. "It's a great moment for our legacy."

James was mustered into service as a private on Jan. 28, 1814, under the command of Capt. Allen Wilkinson in Major Copeland's 3rd Regiment of the Tennessee Militia Infantry. After his participation in the Battle of Horseshoe ended on March 27, 1814, James was discharged on May 10.

James then took his wife, Dicy, and settled in Crawford County around 1816 and 1817. Dicy was awarded an additional 40 acres in Union Township for her husband's service in the war.

James and Dicy parented eight children and, having died in 1845 and 1866, respectively, were buried side by side in the Yates-Union Chapel Cemetery. The graves, until recently, were marked only with the Lands' initials on a sandstone rock.

Descendants in attendance included James and Tyler Land of Evansville, Reg Land of Indianapolis, Rachel Aldridge and Phyllis Coleman, both of Stendall, and George Summers of Taswell.

Pride is a sentiment that was echoed by most of the descendants present. Both Summers and Coleman were slightly emotional when they spoke of their heritage. Coleman, who is the great-great-great-granddaughter of James Land, has a special connection to the proceedings, also having served in the Army.

"I'm just proud to be part of it," Coleman said. "To be a part of the family and to have this."

The ceremony was co-sponsored by the Crawford County Historical and Genealogical Society and the Jonathan Jennings Chapter, United States Daughters of 1812.

VFW Post 6160 of English acted as colorguard and held a gun salute for Land.

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